CADA Bermuda
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Alcohol Facts

CADA has compiled the most current and accurate information available to date on alcohol. We encourage responsible alcohol behaviour.

Why Adults Need to Talk with Young People about Alcohol

Apr 06, 2013

The 2012 Survey of Students Knowledge and Attitudes of Drugs and Health released by the DNDC, where 2,060 9 to 11 year olds were surveyed showed the following:

Average age for first trying alcohol, even a sip, but not including wine at church, 8 years old

% of 9 year olds who had tried alcohol, even a sip, but not including wine at church, 17.4%

% of 10 year olds who had tried alcohol, even a sip, but not including wine at church, 25.3%

% of 11 year olds who had tried alcohol, even a sip, but not including wine at church, 33%


Additionally, the 2011 Bermuda Youth Survey, released by the DNDC, where 3,200 10 to 18 year olds were surveyed showed the following:

Average age for first trying alcohol 12 years old

% of 13 year olds who had tried alcohol 24.5%

% of 14 year olds who had tried alcohol 41%

% of 15 year olds who had tried alcohol 52.5%


These statistics are very troubling because it is proven that the younger a person is when they begin consuming alcohol, the more likely they are to become addicted to alcohol.

Another reason this figure is frightening is because alcohol is the gateway drug, leading to other drugs.

To see how to talk with your children about alcohol click here

And what else can you do as an adult to prevent underage drinking?

Do not give, buy or serve alcohol to young people.
Giving alcohol to someone who is under the age of 18 or turning a blind eye when a young person is consuming alcohol is dangerous and irresponsible. Step in and put a stop to it. It is proven that those who begin consuming alcohol before the age of 15 are 4 times more likely to become addicted to alcohol than those who wait unitl age 21. Some adults use alcohol as a "special occasion celebration," perhaps allowing their child to have a sip of beer or champagne or wine. We must advise strongly against this.

Model responsible alcohol behavior infront of young people
Simply stated, children copy adults behavior, therefore model restraint and set a good example. If you choose to drink, you can positively influence young people by drinking in moderation and never driving if you have been drinking. If you or your partner struggle with alcohol use, seek proffessional help, call 295 5982.

To see how to talk with teenagers about alcohol, click here

Don't keep alcohol in your house, or keep it well out of reach.
If you must keep alcohol in your house, keep it in a place that is high up and out of easy reach to your child, or even better lock your alcohol up.


Facts about alcohol

Feb 07, 2013
Fact: Those who begin drinking before the age of 15 are 4 times more likely to develop alcohol dependence (alcoholism) than those who wait until the age of 21.

Fact: The adolescent brain is more sensitive to the reward chemicals that are released by drugs and alcohol. As a result, early alcohol use sets into motion lifelong cravings for alcohol.

Fact: Children in families with alcoholic members are at a higher risk for alcoholism.

Fact: Drinking alcohol to forget your worries or escape your problems is a warning sign for problem drinking.

Fact: 1 out of every 7 people who drink becomes addicted (alcoholism)

Facts about alcoholism

Feb 01, 2013
Fact: There is no age limit on alcoholism. There are many teenage alcoholics. Teens who drink are at particularly great risk of becoming alcoholic, since the disease develops much more rapidly in young people than in adults.

Fact: Some people use alcohol to forget their worries or to escape reality. Drinking for escape or relief is a warning sign for problem drinking.

Fact: Alcoholism, also known as "alcohol dependence," is a disease that includes alcohol craving and continued drinking despite repeated alcohol-related problems, such as losing a job or getting into trouble with the law.


How you can help the alcoholic - Part 1

Jan 30, 2013
Does someone you know drink too much? Would you like to know how to help them? Here's how...

THE PROBLEM DRINKER SPEAKS
"DON'T pour out my liquor it's just a waste because I can always find ways of getting more. DON'T lie for me or cover up for me. DON'T try to spare me the consequences of my drinking, it may avert or reduce the very crisis that would prompt me to seek help, I can continue to deny that I have a drinking problem as long as you continue to provide an automatic escape from the consequences of my drinking."

How you can help the alcoholic - Part 2

Jan 28, 2013
THE AL-ANON MEMBER SPEAKS:
"The suffering I am trying to ease may be the very thing needed to bring the alcoholic to a realization of the seriousness of the situation...

I will allow the painful consequences of the alcoholics drinking to hit him full force, that way I wont get in the way of his chance to want a better life...


Facts about drinking and driving

Jan 25, 2013
Fact: The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for driving in Bermuda is 0.08

Fact: The vast majority of the people who die on Bermuda's roads are found to be over the legal limit of alcohol or under the influence of drugs.

Fact: The likelihood of crashing increases before you are legally intoxicated. In other words, if you drive after drinking even a small amount of alcohol your likelihood of crashing is increased.


Facts about enabling

Jan 15, 2013
Fact: Enabling is when you don't allow another person to face the consequences of their actions.

Fact: When you keep stepping in and cleaning up the consequences of the problem drinkers problem behavior, you enable the problem drinker to continue drinking comfortably without having to face any consequences. This is enabling.

Fact: If you continue to enable and try to spare the problem drinker the consequences of their drinking, it may avert or reduce the very crisis that would prompt them to seek help.




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Did You Know?

A licensee may refuse to admit, or may expel, any person who is drunk or behaving in a disorderly manner. View all facts

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